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HASH : f9615067cca12141ad7293207fcf2087
La langue: Anglais/Franc
Note moyenne : 4.93/48 (sur 84 notes)
Résumé :
local governments do not stand alone—they find themselves in new relationships not only with state and federal government, but often with a widening spectrum of other public and private organizations as well. the result of this re-forming of local governments calls for new collaborations and managerial responses that occur in addition to

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Critiques, Analyses et Avis (13)
sarahauger
robert agranoff is professor emeritus in the school of public and environmental affairs at indiana university-bloomington, and since 1990, he has been affiliated with the instituto universitario ortega y gasset in madrid. his writings include dimensions of human services integration, intergovernmental management: human services problem solving in six metropolitan areas, and new governance for rural america: creating intergovernmental partnerships. michael mcguire is an associate professor, department of public administration, at the university of north texas and has studied interorganizational and intergovernmental collaboration, rural policy, and economic development strategy. his current work focuses on the skills and behaviors of managers who operate in collaborative settings.
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sarahauger
"local and regional administrators will find in collaborative public management a guide to the future of public management."—publius"managing collaboration across organizational and governmental boundaries presents both tough challenges and also golden opportunities to expand the capacity for effective public action. this book offers plenty of evidence from the front lines and sketches valuable implications for practice as well as research."—laurence j. o'toole jr., professor, school of public and international affairs, the university of georgia"if collaborative public management is the new direction of public administration, then agranoff and mcguire's path breaking book points the way. a first-rate study that combines a thoughtfully developed set of models with creative analysis of the way local officials behave. not only do the authors clearly explain their analytic framework, but they carefully demonstrate how they conducted their research. this important new book will be valuable for scholars and students of city management, intergovernmental relations, and public administration."—dale krane, school of public administration, university of nebraska, omaha"while collaboration has become a commonplace term in the public management and policy fields, rarely has the term been examined with the skill and facility that agranoff and mcguire bring to this book. they have captured the richness and complexity of collaborative management and have used the lens of a specific local government policy area to develop models that include an examination of the players, activities, and policy instruments involved in these activities. this volume clearly stirs the intellectual pot!"—beryl a. radin, professor of government and public administration, university of baltimore
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sarahauger
preface1. collaboration at the core2. managing in an age of collaboration3. models of collaborative management4. collaborative activity and strategy5. linkages in collaborative management6. policy design and collaborative management7. jurisdiction-based management8. the future of public management and the challenge of collaborationappendixesa. survey design and administrationb. economic characteristics of the sample citiesreferencesindex
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sarahauger
in the united states, policymakers and stakeholders are increasingly reaching across local jurisdictional boundaries to resolve common problems in the provision of public services and to achieve shared goals.2 thinking regionally to address these issues is not new, but it has differed in focus over time. in 1909, architect and city planner daniel burnham drafted the plan of chicago that extended beyond the city’s borders to include planning for the development of the surrounding region. this was one of the earliest instances of regional planning in the u.s. and illustrates the city center-outward character of community planning early in the twentieth century (fig. 1).3 the nation also has a long history of local jurisdictions gaining some degree of regional planning authority through annexation or by expanding jurisdictional boundaries in anticipation of growth and larger tax bases. for example, the population of sugar land, texas, grew 150 percent from 1991 to 2006 through a series of annexations that has furthered development in the houston-sugar land-baytown metropolitan area.4
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sarahauger
in 2013, 8 out of 10 local governments were participating in regional councils of governments, metropolitan planning organizations, or regional planning agencies. although initially established to meet federal funding requirements and state mandates, many of these groups have shifted their attention beyond regional comprehensive planning to addressing members’ local service delivery needs.11 icma reports that in 2013, the issues most often at the top of the planning agenda for these multijurisdictional organizations were roads and highways, economic development, and public transit. participation in such regional planning organizations was greater in larger urban localities, such as metropolitan denver, than in smaller, less-populated areas.12 metropolitan denver’s regional council of governments consists of more than 50 local city and county governments that work collaboratively on growth management, transportation, traffic congestion, and air and water quality issues of concern throughout the region.13 by contrast, the ecitygov alliance, a smaller, regional initiative, makes government services and municipal amenities available online to residents of nine cities in washington’s puget sound region.14 such intergovernmental collaboration is the most common form of partnership now used to plan and provide for public services.
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sarahauger
this trend toward regional thinking and collaboration (fig. 2) corresponds to the evolution of increasingly complex challenges that are unconstrained by political, geographical, racial, ethnic, and economic boundaries (see “partnerships and planning for impact”). today’s immediate challenges to local communities and regions stem from the effects of the great recession, demographic changes, diminishing tax bases and revenues, shrinking federal resources, new and greater demand for services, and the expansion of metropolitan economic regions that contain numerous local governmental entities, resulting in uneven and fragmented service delivery.15 contextual conditions such as these, in tandem with motivations such as those named in the icma survey and other drivers, give rise to cross-jurisdictional collaboration.16
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sarahauger
the increasing reliance on multigovernmental, multijurisdictional, and multisectoral approaches to challenges places new demands on local governments; the capacities required to collaborate are quite different from those needed to manage a single organization.19, 20 to help local jurisdictions plan collaborative action, the enhanced partnership of icma, along with the alliance for innovation and the center for urban innovation at arizona state university, introduced an evidence-based collaborative services decision matrix tool in 2014. this tool is designed to help users determine the assets, contract specification and monitoring requirements, labor, capital, costs, management competencies, and administrative stability needed for a collaborative effort. the tool also helps stakeholders weigh community factors that could affect outcomes, such as potential partners, council orientation and political environment, fiscal and economic health, unions, and public interests. grounded in a synthesis of the literature and case study research, the tool also offers a rough estimate of the likelihood that a collaboration will be successful.21 the enhanced partnership contends that a comprehensive discussion of these factors allows the stakeholders to understand the soft and hard costs as well as the benefits involved in a plan to deliver public services collaboratively. at the same time, the tool begins the process through which relationships, mutual trust, and a capacity to problem-solve together grow.22
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sarahauger
as local leaders decide to collaborate across jurisdictional boundaries, says brookings institution visiting fellow and regional governance expert kathryn foster, they face three big questions about the authority to plan and implement, how planning will be implemented and by whom, and in what territory. because these relationships do not depend on legal authority to ensure that the goals are met, collaborative arrangements must rely on other forces and skills to create the cohesion necessary to achieve objectives — that is, there must be a transition from government to governance. foster points to the importance in regional governance of having participants with political legitimacy, the authority to back policies, and respect for local jurisdictional decisions on policies with local impact. also important to the process is “developed authority,” which can emerge from the synergy of all the elements of collaboration — “professional staff, ample expertise, high social capital with public entities, and policy sway resting in the persuasive powers of agency leaders and board members.”24
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sarahauger
feedback from local government officials about their experiences with collaboration emphasizes the importance of thinking regionally, building on existing relationships, being as inclusive as possible, involving the right partners with the needed expertise or authority, and being flexible.25 members of an expert panel of practitioners consulted by the state and local government review about interlocal collaboration also stressed the importance of preexisting relationships. in addition to the trust and confidence that are built over time in relationships, the transaction costs are lower if there is mutual recognition of problems and of opportunities to work together, as one panel member noted. transaction costs rise with the need to convince and persuade an organization to collaborate.26
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sarahauger
whether governmental collaborations and partnerships can be deemed successful requires careful study. success stories are commonly reported, but failed experiments are mentioned less often. more research that extends beyond case studies is needed (see “partnerships and planning for impact”). reviews and analyses of case study literature reveal a large emphasis on the collaborative process itself, rather than policy or management outcomes, although some studies do have this focus. bel and warner analyzed available research on cost savings from intermunicipal cooperation for service delivery and found a few instances of services, such as solid waste management, in which economies of scale permitted reduced service costs, although this finding might be of greater benefit to smaller municipalities than to larger ones. bel and warner also noted that the transaction costs of collaborative governance were likely to rise with the number of actors involved.27 in another analysis of a diverse set of 137 case studies of collaborative governance, ansell and gash discovered a lack of common language, missing data, very few evaluations of outcomes, and no comparisons with outcomes from other forms of governance. by identifying the most frequent and common findings from the sample of collaboration cases, these scholars found four types of variables frequently discussed in their sample of studies: starting conditions, institutional design, leadership, and the collaborative process. the overarching conclusion of this meta-analysis was that the success of collaborative governance depends on adequate time for the process as well as on trust and interdependence among the participants. 28
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sarahauger
see stephen calabrese, glenn cassidy, and dennis epple. 2002. "local government fiscal structure and metropolitan consolidation," project muse, brookings-wharton papers on urban affairs; joseph n. heiney. 2012. "can state & local government consolidation really save money?" journal of business & economics research10:10, 539–46; joseph martin and eric a. scorsone. 2011. "cost ramifications of municipal consolidation: a comparative analysis," journal of public budgeting, accounting & financial management 23:3, 311–37; frank gamrat and jake haulk. 2005. "merging governments: lessons from louisville, indianapolis, and philadelphia," pittsburgh, pennsylvania: allegheny institute for public policy.
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sarahauger
agranoff's number of consultancies in public administration and public service exceeds three dozen. he was a nationally recognized expert on the integration of public human services programs in the 1970's and 1980's. agranoff contributed to the 1981 white house conference on aging, and he helped develop the allied services approach within the u.s. department of health, education and welfare (dhew) and the department of health and human services (dhhs).
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sarahauger
at spea, agranoff has served in several leadership roles over the years, including director of the public affairs and the public policy doctoral programs, chair of the policy and administration faculty, and associate dean.highlightsspea faculty member for 30+ years2008 best book award, academy of management and american society for public administration for "managing within networks"2000 donald stone outstanding scholar in intergovernmental management award from the american society for public administrationprimary consultant to the indiana governor's human services agency reorganization team in the early 1990sgovernment structures committee consultant, 1981 white house conference on agingselected works
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